The ethics of scarcity.

This is about COVID 19 and a nice bit of information: there are ususally around 180 ICU beds for the five million kiwis. If half a percent need them with the current virus, that is 500 per million, or 2500 for the population. There is a reason our leaders are talking about “slowing the curve”. We are not prepared, and even though we make these in NZ, we don’t have enough.

WIlder, Wealthy and Wise

As I receive information from first hand from Italy, and am obviously living the situation currently unfolding in England, it might be wise to give some coordinates as to where we are. So, there is goes.

This is not a hoax. It’s no fake news. It’s real, and it’s serious. Believe me, I am not the guy who “buys the hype”. I don’t believe in global warming, or in papal conspiracy theories, and think myself solidly grounded in reality. I receive constant reports *from the ground in Italy*. Take it from me, this is as real as it comes.
Most people will obviously survive. Most *old* people will, obviously, also survive. It is not the Plague, or the Huns invading our lands. It is somewhere between a nasty flu and the Spanish Flu. Most of us will not only survive, but thrive.
The real issue is an ethical, not medical, one. The people who are seriously affected by the Coronavirus need intensive care unit places, and specialised equipment. No Country on the planet has the equipment to face such an emergency, as the cases come all together. Therefore, a relatively limited number of cases causes a very real emergency and short-circuits the system.
This means that, whilst the number or dead will, likely, not be a big multiple of those who die for the flu every year (I will tell you below why I think that), what is terrifying is the horror scenario of hospitals and doctors having to choose who gets treated and who will likely die. This, and no other, is the problem as it appears now and with the information I am getting.
The latter point poses (immediately in Italy, and later everywhere else), a fundamental question: are we, as Nations, the kind of people who allow such a situation to happen in the first place? My answer to this is, clearly, a resounding “no”. To answer otherwise means to have the same mindset as those who, say, want to leave people free to die by euthanasia. The defence of the population is one of the primary duties of every Nation. The defence of the more vulnerable people should be an even bigger priority. We are Christians, for crying out loud. Leave the “survival of the fittest” rubbish to the Darwinists. To say that we should pray for the people at risk is an empty slogan, if we then refuse to actually help them. God works through us. We should be the help we are praying for.
Still, there should be, as in everything, the limits given by elementary common sense. For example: has it ever been a tradition, in Christian Countries, to stop everything during the Flu season, so that more old people could be spared from getting the flu, thus reducing the number of deaths? You know the answer. In the end, elementary common sense must be safeguarded, and the population must be free to go about their business and put food on the table.

If you ask me, we are now, everywhere in Europe, in the midst of the thinking I have explained under point 5. The fact that all this is meant to protect a tiny but important part of the population, and an all-important part to protect our sense of decency and common humanity, is generally accepted in Europe. But all this works on the assumption of a hit to the economy, not a total collapse and TEOTWAWKI.

The UK is running out of ventilators right now, and it will get worse.

What is happening is that things are changing, and the old progressive system is gone with it. Completely. One of the practitioners of the dark arts of politics, Cam Slater said this yesterday.

Globalism is dead, open borders is dead, Migration pacts are dead. Thee EU is dead. Nationalism will grow. Sucking up to thee corrupt Chinese government is dead. You are spot on. National has to divorce itself from Chinese government agents, start thinking nationalist or die.

Cam Slater

This is a phase shift, and all phase shifts are chaotic.

We are in a Black Swan event, probably the biggest of your life, and 9/11 was no slouch. Neither I, nor anyone else can tell you exactly what the future will bring. But as I mentioned in my last post, the universe is a harsh grader. The final exam is pass/fail. And passing means you live.

George Wilder

It is not time to panic. There is still time to prepare. Don’t think things won’t change: they will. The only certainty we have is the resurrection to come. So prepare what you can, and let the greens worry about the world. They will neglect their families for Gaia. You should not.

One thought on “The ethics of scarcity.

  1. I made my first appt to give blood today… it cheered me *immensely* to find out I couldn’t make it for the first few I tried, they were booked up.

    “How can I help” is a good question both as a Christian and as someone who wishes to retain sanity and humanity.

Comments are closed.