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Australia New Zealand

The week in reaction: Storm the Green Barricades.

24

The main thing this week has been a bug getting into NZ. I sent emails to those to whom it was needful 72 hours before I started blogging and I truly hoped I was being paraniod. But as usual, the media have amplified this into a panic, which is causing at the moment more damage than the virus. I have sworn off flying or conferences for the next few months, which has made Kea happy and will take some stress of our bank accounts — though most of the time they are funded by my employers you end up eating out more than you would and buying stuff because it is shiny and unavailable locally.

For some things moderation does not work. (Coffee being one of them: I have a bigger habit than the author). Adam comments, unconsciously putting Roosh, like Augustine, among those who suffer from scrupulosity.

I would wager that Roosh falls into the exaggerator camp. One of the problems with exaggerators is when they start to get things under control. They need to search around for answers to their exaggerating plight. In this, as in everything else that they do, they tend to exaggerate. Roosh is not correct that there is no such thing as moderation. The truth is that there is simply no such thing as moderation for him.

Why are we reacting

Some people may wonder why these posts exist, and why I bother. The progressive project is going pretty much ss planned in NZ: sanctimonious, judgemental, and incompetent. In part it is because at present the left progressives have power, and they can be murderous. The following is from one of Wilder’s posts, and you should really read the entire thing.

From Wilder, Wealthy and Wise.

In the antipodes, the aim is to disestablish any voice of reaction. Note to the student: this never ends well. People will try to keep a low profile, and if that is not an option, there will eventually be rebellion. For there is no option left to revolt but the fate of the kulak.

Looking at the big picture, I’ve finally concluded that Australia is terminally rooted. Same for the UK. The US is getting close, but there’s still a yeoman army out in the sticks with the capacity to replace their various governments.

In Australia, the political class have not only sold out heritage Aussies, but poisoned the well so that none of us can make a difference via electoral politics. The masses of ordinary people here (like ordinary people everywhere) are decent but sheep. Decent sheep aren’t going to stand up and change the country’s direction; instead, they’re going to keep on being PAYG livestock, free range but not by any measure free.

On present trends Australia’s going to be a Chinese client state, probably in our own lifetimes. I’m not one to easily give up, but Down Under I think Clary’s view is now the one to take: things are screwed, we can’t fix them, time to look out for our own and try to live as good a life as we can manage . . . and make ourselves ready just in case Spicy Times arrive.

The one hope is that (a) some dramatic unforeseen catastrophe will shake the political class’s grip and (b) by some amazing stroke of luck, we get through it OK instead of even worse.

For reasons I don’t understand, Sinc at Catallaxy Files seems to be moving more and more in favour of the political class. For example, his refusal to consider hammering the big social media sites for (eg) defamation is, to me, completely incomprehensible. Meanwhile I’ve somehow managed to get soft-banned at the Cat, which is pretty hard to do.

Anyway, 2020 is supposed to be a year with minimum social media.

All the best to you and yours during these strange days.

But what will happen it this: people will get angry. About a decade ago I was visiting my parents with by then teenage sons and one of those official Greenpeace (TM) beggars asked for money. I said no, politely. He (being not from NZ, and not understanding how we do things) said that I should care because global warming. I said bring global warming on: I live in the South and it would be nice not to deal with black ice. He looked at me like a stunned fish.

I’m now nastier. I’ve moved from contempt to active subversion. It is as Delingpole says, time to storm the barricades. It will be easy. They eat soy while I eat liver.

This is the year we storm the green barricades.

If you don’t like the sound of that ‘we’, fine, I’ll take ’em on my own. But I suspect that quite a few of you feel as angry about this thing as I do. The Green Blob — aka the Climate Industrial Complex — is one of the most insidiously dangerous and oppressive forces in the world today and it’s time we hit back hard.

Green ideology is evil. It’s killing our jobs, it’s brainwashing our kids (and stealing their future), it’s despoiling our landscapes, it’s murdering our wildlife, it’s corrupting honest science, it’s enriching the most disgusting, cynical people in crony capitalism, it’s driving up the cost of living, it’s holding back our economies, it’s hamstringing business, it’s burning our homes…

How dare these nauseating green zealots try to lecture us on how to save the planet when they’re the ones doing so much of the harm!

Institutional Mistrust

The issue of what to do with public health is starting to bite. It’s OK to say not panic if things are routine, ad for most people they are routine, even in Ital. But when the press lies, and the politicians lie, then no one trust anything.

I’m saying that as 43 medical staff are home self isolating after one patient, and the government is suggesting that they bring retired doctors and nurses back, and to hell with the regulations we have around competency and continuing education.

What public trust once existed in the government, institutions and media has been burned to death, the ashes wrapped in an EU flag then burned again over the last 4 or so years. Understandably, when something big comes along that is an actual problem, no-one believes a word you say, and that could cause consternation, confusion, cognitive dissonance, panic and plenty of other more serious stuff that ought to be avoidable given any modicum of institutional trust.

Al Jaom