Canto III

This is when it gets difficult, because Pound becomes personal in the first part. Personal means tied to the popular culture of the day: as an older man I always consider that gondolas cost too much. I’d rather walk, and the crowds are not in any way dryad like. Canto III I sat on the Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

The paraphrase that Locke did continues. Locke is working on the following verse Cast me not away from your presence/ and take not your Holy Spirit from me. (Ps 51:11, ESV). Sprite, to Locke, was used as we would use spirit, and the remainder of the text is fairly clear. Loe prostrate, Lorde, before thy Continue Reading

Canto II

More Pound, and at this point you need to know your way around the poets of his time, and it helps if you have some of the clues. Sordello was Browning’s long poem,, that took seven years. The cantos, however, took most of Pound’s life, and in my view were never finished. Extract Book the Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

This is one of those things where the older language and the newer language differ. The verse Locke is paraphrasing in a modern translation is. Create in me a clean heart, O God,    and renew a right[b] spirit within me. Psalm 51:10, ESV However, the text Locke paraphrased is listed beside the sonnet, and is difficult Continue Reading

Friday Kipling.

Kipling wrote about the rankers. Yes, it was colonialism. But there was honour, and truth, and beauty. Our postcolonial time has lost these. Gunga Din You may talk o’ gin and beerWhen you’re quartered safe out ‘ere,An’ you’re sent to penny-fights an’ Aldershot it;But when it comes to slaughterYou will do your work on water,An’ Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

The paraphrase continues, and the text Locke wrote a sonnet on here is Hide your face from my sins, and blot out all my iniquities. (Ps 51:9). Locke, as a Christian, prays as we all ought: Look not how I/Am foul by sin; but make me by your grace/Pure in thy mercies sake. Loke on Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

One of the things in church today is that we will see revival when he number of people with sadness, despair and addiction decrease. For our guilt leads to shame: though we deny there is a law we find it within us. We cannot keep our own standards, let alone God’s. The text of the Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

Locke continues. Hyssop was used to sprinkle consecrated water on healed lepers as a rite of purification. (Leviticus 14:3-8). Locke takes this as analogy: as the priest cleansed the leper, So David pleaded for his guilt to be removed, and so Locke looks to Christ for his mercy Purify me with hyssop, and I shall Continue Reading