Sunday Sonnet

Locke is paraphrasing a psalm in which David asks forgiveness. He not only stole Bathsheba from her husband, but ensured he was killed in a coverup. It is often the coverup that does more damage. The verse paraphrased today is the second half of verse four. Against you, you only, have I sinned    and done what Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

The text for Locke’s sonnet is Psalm 51:3 For I know my transgressions, And my sin is ever before me. Smart mean pain, gilt is not golden but guilt. Most of the rest is fairly self explanatory. As usual, if in doubt, read it out loud: Scots accent is optional. Haue mercie, Lord, haue mercie: Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

Anne Locke continues her paraphrase, remaining in the first verse of Psalm 51. She cannot count her faults or number the deeds she has done in error. But she trusts that the mercy of God is greater. According to your abundant mercy    blot out my transgressions. Psalm 51:1b, ESV  My many sinnes in nomber are encreast,With Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

I am repeating this sonnet sequence, in part because it is reformed, in part because it is in English, and in part because it predates Shakespeare, and finally, because Tudor women were tough. These are the biographical facts of Anne Locke’s life: she was the daughter of Steven Vaughan, who was in Henry VIII’s service Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

Two blogs ago I went through Anne Locke’s sonnets, and translated them. Not going to do that again: this is Elizabethan English, and a meditation on Psalm 51. To make it easier, I’m attaching the verse from a modern, accurate translation. Be gracious to me, O God, according to Your lovingkindness; According to the greatness Continue Reading