Sunday Sonnet.

Today we have the last of Anne Locke’s sonnet sequence: it begins with a five sonnet introduction. In this sonnet, as in the psalm, the writer turns from their plea for absolution to praise. The text today is the final verse: then will you delight in right sacrifices, in burnt offerings and whole burnt offerings; Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

This is the second to last Sonnet in this sequence. The text is Do good to Zion in your good pleasure; build up the walls of Jerusalem (in a modern translation, and this was expanded by Locke, using Zion for worship and Jerusalem for the city. The spelling is early modern Scots English, so read Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

We are approaching the end of Anne Locke’s sonnet sequence. Why did I bother? Well, it is good, the first use of the Shakespearean Sonnet form in Englisht (predating the Bard) and it is an example of how we should react to our own wrongdoing. Today’s paraphrase is The sacrifices of God are xa broken Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

It is late Sunday Evening. We have had a series of storms over the weekend, and other things to do. There has been a loss of status for our rugby team, and NZ is in mourning. But we don’t consider as much as we ought our situation before God. Locke corrects us. The text Locke Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

Locke continues with the second half of her poem cycle. She is following the psalmist, who is praising God for his forgiveness despite (in the case of David, who managed to procure the death of Bathsheba’s husband) there being scandal upon scandal. Her text is Deliuer me from bloud o God, God of my helth Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnett

One tries to keep this sonnet cycle in sequence. The text today is Restore unto me the joy of your salvation (again Psalm 51) and Locke’s paraphrase uses words one would not do now, such as affiance — contract into the future a relationship — and whilhom(e) means once, formerly. But render me my wonted Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

The paraphrase that Locke did continues. Locke is working on the following verse Cast me not away from your presence/ and take not your Holy Spirit from me. (Ps 51:11, ESV). Sprite, to Locke, was used as we would use spirit, and the remainder of the text is fairly clear. Loe prostrate, Lorde, before thy Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

This is one of those things where the older language and the newer language differ. The verse Locke is paraphrasing in a modern translation is. Create in me a clean heart, O God,    and renew a right[b] spirit within me. Psalm 51:10, ESV However, the text Locke paraphrased is listed beside the sonnet, and is difficult Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

Locke continues. Hyssop was used to sprinkle consecrated water on healed lepers as a rite of purification. (Leviticus 14:3-8). Locke takes this as analogy: as the priest cleansed the leper, So David pleaded for his guilt to be removed, and so Locke looks to Christ for his mercy Purify me with hyssop, and I shall Continue Reading