Sunday Sonnet.

More Donne. The Puritans knew death. Up close and personal. Death to their beloved children, death from farm animals, death in the kitchen or in childbirth, and the same afflictions that we have now. No man knew when their life would end: and with the changes in King and Commonwealth, choosing the wrong side and Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet

Donne compares himself with four types of corruption: the drunkard, the thief, the sexually immoral and those who are proud of their acts. He did have a better vocabulary than we are allowed in this fallen time, where being proud is mandatory, and the godly sorrow of repentance is considered unthinkable, a crime against the Continue Reading

Sunday Sonnet.

After Anne Locke, John Donne. Later, much later: Donne was a Puritan — equally reformed — but while Locke was a refugee from the Catholic Monarch of England, Donne was a functionary for the Commonwealth that replaced the monarchy under Cromwell. His Holy Sonnets remain some of the best in English. Religious or secular. Thou Continue Reading